Ruling LDP leadership contender Kishida vows to narrow income gap – The Foreigners magazine In tokyo
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Ruling LDP leadership contender Kishida vows to narrow income gap

Written by on September 8, 2021


Former Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida vowed Wednesday to boost people’s income and narrow disparities through redistribution of wealth in the post-pandemic era, announcing his economic policies for the ruling Liberal Democratic Party’s presidential election.

“The economic gap will widen further if we do the same things we have been doing,” Kishida said, although deregulation and structural reforms pursued by Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga and his predecessor Shinzo Abe “undoubtedly yielded results.”

Former Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida announces his economic policy at the parliament building in Tokyo on Sept. 8, 2021, as he prepares to run in the Liberal Democratic Party presidential election on Sept. 29, which will effectively determine Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga’s successor. (Kyodo) ==Kyodo

“Unless we properly distribute the fruits of growth, we cannot prevent disparities from widening,” Kishida told a press conference in Tokyo, pledging to expand the middle class by providing support to people raising children.

In late August, Kishida declared his bid for the Sept. 29 race, which will effectively decide the next prime minister as the LDP controls the powerful lower house of parliament.

Former Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida announces his economic policy at the parliament building in Tokyo on Sept. 8, 2021, as he prepares to run in the Liberal Democratic Party presidential election on Sept. 29, which will effectively determine Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga’s successor. (Kyodo) ==Kyodo

After Suga abruptly announced last week his intention to resign, the election is now expected to be a three-way contest between Kishida, former communications minister Sanae Takaichi and vaccine chief Taro Kono.

Kishida also pledged to revive regional economies while correcting excessive concentration of the population and industries in the Tokyo metropolitan area.

To achieve the country’s goal of net zero emissions by 2050, Kishida said Japan needs various options other than renewable energy, such as hydrogen and nuclear energy, touching on the need to maintain nuclear technology.

As for the two other contenders, Takaichi is scheduled to formally announce her bid later in the day, while Kono is expected to do so later this week.

Takaichi is believed to have secured the prerequisite endorsement from 20 lawmakers with the help of former Prime Minister Abe, under whom she served as minister of internal affairs and communications as well as LDP policy chief.

Meanwhile, four opposition parties including the main opposition Constitutional Democratic Party of Japan agreed on a set of joint pledges on Wednesday, including lowering the consumption tax rate and achieving a zero-carbon society without nuclear energy.

The CDPJ, the Japanese Communist Party, the Social Democratic Party and Reiwa Shinsengumi also vowed to raise the minimum wage, oppose amending the Constitution and giving couples the option of keeping separate surnames after marriage.


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Taro Kono tops opinion poll as most fit to become Japan’s next PM






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